Port of Vancouver USA

The Port of Vancouver USA will make the following adjustment to the terminal Tariff No. 6 effective July 1, 2017. Click here to view changes.

HOLIDAY CLOSURE – INDEPENDENCE DAY, JULY 4 – The Port of Vancouver USA, will be closed for receipt and delivery of cargo on Monday, July 3, Tuesday, July 4 and Wednesday, July, 5, 2017, in honor of the July 4th Independence Day holiday. Vessel activity will not be interrupted on July 3 and 4, however overtime rates apply. July 5 is an ILWU no-work holiday, so there will be no cargo activity. The admin office will also be closed on July 4.

Year in Review

2016 Year in Review

Strategic decisions over the past decade have positioned the Port of Vancouver USA to take full advantage of upticks in the global economy. Leveraging revenue, tax dollars, and federal and state grant funds, the port continues to invest in critical infrastructure and assets, including rail, equipment, facilities and staff.

For the third year in a row, the Port of Vancouver delivered a record year in tonnage. For the first time in the port’s 105-year history, tonnage exceeded 7 million metric tons.

Despite impressive gains in overall tonnage, fluctuations in currency and the global economy had an impact on the port in 2016, contributing to a slight decline in operating revenue, which decreased from $38.2 million to $35.9 million.

Operating income (5.9 percent decrease from 2015)*

* 2016 – $53,909,165

* 2015 – $38,163,903

* 2014 – $37,547,076

Operating expenses (1.3 percent increase from 2015)*

* 2016 – $29,846,353

* 2015 – $29,463,411

* 2014 – $26,997,781

Net profit (30 percent decrease from 2015)*

* 2016 – $6,062,812

* 2015 – $8,700,492

* 2014 – $10,549,295

Total net asset increase in 11 years (214 percent increase over 2005)*

* 2016 – $424 million

* 2005 – $135 million

*These numbers have not yet been confirmed by the Washington State Auditor’s Office

Global demand drives impressive cargo tonnage increase

The port recorded 7.49 million metric tons in 2016, nearly eight percent more than the 2015 record of 6.95 million metric tons. 2016 was great year for exports, which climbed to 6.32 million metric tons from 5.54 million metric tons in 2015 – a 14 percent increase overall.

Total cargo tonnage (7.6 percent increase from 2015)

* 2016 – 7,488,352 metric tons

* 2015 – 6,957,221 metric tons

* 2014 – 6,598,830 metric tons

Vessel calls (3.3 percent decrease from 2015)

* 2016 – 410 vessels

* 2015 – 424 vessels

* 2014 – 452 vessels

Total rail cars (16.5 percent increase from 2015)

* 2016 – 65,100 rail cars

* 2015 – 55,874 rail cars

* 2014 – 56,291 rail cars

Steady growth in exports continues

Grain continues to be the largest export at the Port of Vancouver by volume, and in 2016 these cargoes increased 17.8 percent over 2015.

Below is a sample of the port’s export cargo from 2013 – 2015.

Overall exports (14.1 percent increase from 2015)

* 2016 – 6,319,936 metric tons

* 2015 – 5,540,913 metric tons

* 2014 – 5,335,007 metric tons

Copper exports (74 percent increase from 2015)

* 2016 – 229,173 metric tons

* 2015 – 131,561 metric tons

* 2014 – 385,088 metric tons

Bentonite clay exports (23.1 percent decrease from 2015)

* 2016 – 132,021 metric tons

* 2015 – 171,658 metric tons

* 2014 – 116,414 metric tons

Jet fuel exports (32.8 percent increase from 2015)

* 2016 – 41,544 metric tons

* 2015 – 31,275 metric tons

* 2014 – 31,294 metric tons

Wheat, soybeans and corn exports (16.9 percent increase from 2015)

* 2016 – 5.33 million metric tons

* 2015 – 4.56 million metric tons

* 2014 – 4.29 million metric tons

Wheat exports (2.1 percent decrease from 2015)

* 2016 – 2,191,813 metric tons

* 2015 – 2,239,322 metric tons

* 2014 – 2,588,643 metric tons

Soy exports (20.3 percent increase from 2015)

* 2016 – 1,415,264 million metric tons

* 2015 – 1,176,880 million metric tons

* 2014 – 741,675 metric tons

Corn exports (49.6 percent increase from 2015)

* 2016 – 1,722,033 million metric tons

* 2015 – 1,150,976 million metric tons

* 2014 – 962,909 metric tons

Scrap metal exports (12.2 percent decrease from 2015)

* 2016 – 346,855 metric tons

* 2015 – 395,058 metric tons

* 2014 – 351,675 metric tons

Pulp exports (33.8 percent decrease from 2015)

* 2016 – 81,569 metric tons

* 2015 – 123,149 metric tons

* 2014 – 8,391 metric tons

Imports decline slightly in 2016

Some imports, such as wind energy components increased in 2016, but overall imports were down 17 percent in 2016.

Overall imports (17.5 percent decrease from 2015)

* 2016 – 1,168,415 million metric tons

* 2015 – 1,416,308 million metric tons

* 2014 – 1,263,823 million metric tons

Steel imports (19.4 percent decrease from 2015)

* 2016 – 621,142 metric tons

* 2015 – 770,627 metric tons

* 2014 – 590,170 metric tons

Jet fuel imports (2.3 percent increase from 2015)

* 2016 – 63,516 metric tons

* 2015 – 62,106 metric tons

* 2014 – 65,503 metric tons

Wind energy imports (increase from 2015)

* 2016 – 11,434 metric tons

* 2015 – 0 metric tons

* 2014 – 25,228 metric tons

Pulp imports (70.2 percent decrease from 2015)

* 2016 – 7,000 metric tons

* 2015 – 23,496 metric tons

* 2014 – 73,282 metric tons

Subaru of America Inc. (2.9 percent decrease from 2015)

* 2016 – 87,600 vehicles

* 2015 – 90,183 vehicles

* 2014 – 81,718 vehicles

Industrial occupancy remains high Industrial occupancy at the port exceeds 99 percent. The port’s tenants offer a wide range of products and services – everything from wood paneling and aluminum extrusion to food transportation and electronics recycling. There was a slight decrease in the amount of vessels that came through the port in 2016. One contributing factor is the Columbia River Channel Deepening Project, completed in 2010. The project deepened the river’s navigation channel to 43 feet, allowing larger ships carrying more cargo to traverse the river. There was, however, a 16.5 percent increase in total rail cars in 2016, a sign of increased capacity and capability of the port’s rail system due to the West Vancouver Freight Access Project.

Environmental innovation, community investments continue. For the sixth year in a row, the port continued its commitment to renewable energy through the purchase Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) equal to 100 percent of its purchased electricity. The port also continued its innovative stormwater management efforts, using biofiltration technology to control zinc, oil and other runoff contaminants. The port’s innovative stormwater management also included the installation of floating wetlands in its Terminal 4 stormwater retention pond to help reduce heavy metals, such as copper and zinc.

Explore other pages in this section

Stay in the loop

Keep up on current port events by subscribing to our newsletters and follow us on , and

Questions? Comments?

We'd love to hear from you.